Deliver Us From Evil

By on in

Editor's Note: Halloween is tomorrow and as the world often uses this time of the year to focus on things that are evil – devils and witches, goblins and ghouls – it’s good for us to be reminded that as Christians, we have been instructed by Christ to pray, “Deliver us from evil.”


“But Deliver Us from Evil”

2850  The last petition to our Father is also included in Jesus’ prayer: “I am not asking you to take them out of the world, but I ask you to protect them from the evil one.”[1] It touches each of us personally, but it is always “we” who pray, in communion with the whole Church, for the deliverance of the whole human family. The Lord’s Prayer continually opens us to the range of God’s economy of salvation. Our interdependence in the drama of sin and death is turned into solidarity in the Body of Christ, the “communion of saints.”[2]

2851  In this petition, evil is not an abstraction, but refers to a person, Satan, the Evil One, the angel who opposes God. The devil (dia-bolos) is the one who “throws himself across” God’s plan and his work of salvation accomplished in Christ.

2852  “A murderer from the beginning,… a liar and the father of lies,” Satan is “the deceiver of the whole world.”[3] Through him sin and death entered the world and by his definitive defeat all creation will be “freed from the corruption of sin and death.”[4] Now “we know that anyone born of God does not sin, but He who was born of God keeps him, and the evil one does not touch him. We know that we are of God, and the whole world is in the power of the evil one.”[5]

The Lord who has taken away your sin and pardoned your faults also protects you and keeps you from the wiles of your adversary the devil, so that the enemy, who is accustomed to leading into sin, may not surprise you. One who entrusts himself to God does not dread the devil. “If God is for us, who is against us?”[6]

2853  Victory over the “prince of this world”[7] was won once for all at the Hour when Jesus freely gave himself up to death to give us his life. This is the judgment of this world, and the prince of this world is “cast out.”[8] “He pursued the woman”[9] but had no hold on her: the new Eve, “full of grace” of the Holy Spirit, is preserved from sin and the corruption of death (the Immaculate Conception and the Assumption of the Most Holy Mother of God, Mary, ever virgin). “Then the dragon was angry with the woman, and went off to make war on the rest of her offspring.”[10] Therefore the Spirit and the Church pray: “Come, Lord Jesus,”[11] since his coming will deliver us from the Evil One.

2854  When we ask to be delivered from the Evil One, we pray as well to be freed from all evils, present, past, and future, of which he is the author or instigator. In this final petition, the Church brings before the Father all the distress of the world. Along with deliverance from the evils that overwhelm humanity, she implores the precious gift of peace and the grace of perseverance in expectation of Christ’s return. By praying in this way, she anticipates in humility of faith the gathering together of everyone and everything in him who has “the keys of Death and Hades,” who “is and who was and who is to come, the Almighty.”[12]

Deliver us, Lord, we beseech you, from every evil and grant us peace in our day, so that aided by your mercy we might be ever free from sin and protected from all anxiety, as we await the blessed hope and the coming of our Savior, Jesus Christ.[13]

To read more from the catechism, click here.  Copyright Libreria Editrice Vaticana.  Reprinted with permission.



[1] Jn 17:15.

[2] Cf. RP 16.

[3] Jn 8:44; Rev 12:9.

[4] Roman Missal, Eucharistic Prayer IV, 125.

[5] 1 Jn 5:18-19.

[6] St. Ambrose, De Sacr. 5, 4, 30: PL 16, 454; cf. Rom 8:31.

[7] Jn 14:30.

[8] Jn 12:31; Rev 12:10.

[9] Rev 12:13-16.

[10] Rev 12:17.

[11] Rev 22:17, 20.

[12] Rev 1:8, 18; cf. Rev 1:4; Eph 1:10.

[13] Roman Missal, Embolism after the Lord’s Prayer, 126: Libera nos, quæsumus, Domine, ab omnibus malis, da propitius pacem in diebus nostris, ut, ope misericordiæ tuæ adiuti, et a peccato simus semper liberi, et ab omni perturbatione securi: expectantes beatam spem et adventum Salvatoris nostri Iesu Christi.


Editor’s Note: During the month of November, as we celebrate the final days of the Year of Faith, we’d like to feature stories from YOU about the blessings and fruits you’ve experienced during this year.  How did you celebrate?  What did you do to grow in faith? How did your relationship with Christ and His Church deepen?
Send us your stories and reflections to myyearoffaith@gmail.com along with your contact information, and your reflection could be featured here on the blog in November!
Submissions should be under 500 words; deadline for submissions is October 31st.

 
Catechism of the Catholic Church

About Catechism of the Catholic Church

The Catechism contains the essential and fundamental content of the Catholic faith, presented within the context of the Church's history and tradition. Frequent references to Sacred Scripture, the writings of the Fathers, the lives and writings of the saints, conciliar and papal documents and liturgical texts enrich the Catechism in a way that is both inviting and challenging. The Catechism is divided into four major parts, the "four pillars" on which the Catechism is built: 1. the Creed (what the Church believes), 2. the Sacraments (what the Church celebrates), 3. the Commandments (what the Church lives) and 4). the Our Father (what the Church prays). Use this link to view an online version of the Catechism from the USCCB: http://www.usccb.org/beliefs-and-teachings/what-we-believe/catechism/catechism-of-the-catholic-church/epub/index.cfm